Again, not recommended for shibari, but everything else goes, and I’ve heard that there are actually dyes which will change the colour of nylon

You can carry a lot of it around with you. It’s not hugely expensive. Buy Rope! What are the pros and cons of different types of rope? However, once I removed the core, that changed things considerably (If you want to know how to remove the core, send me a message or something and I’ll update). Pros. It wouldn’t ordinarily have gotten my attention, because it looks fairly obviously too stiff for use as bondage rope. However, as I examined it, I realized that I could probably remove the core. Many may be satisfied with cotton. And tastes and priorities may change, which is cool.

Next we have a polypropylene webbing. Polypropylene with core intactPolypropylene Webbing (core removed). Con: Doesn’t take dye as well. That is, the colors will be more muted, less brilliant. Let’s face it, sometimes the Internet is just more convenient. Next we have a polypropylene webbing.

Again, when washed, boiled etc it tends to degrade. That doesn’t mean you can’t do it; it won’t catastrophically weaken your rope, but with successive washes I would start keeping a much closer eye on how much load I put on it. Cons. This is a very thin plastic webbing; it is not something you want to get too close to a naked flame, because it will melt. Let’s face it, sometimes the Internet is just more convenient. Next we have a polypropylene webbing. I had my Zen rope for quick synthetic ties, and I later moved on to focus on natural fibres. However, I snapped a couple of pictures of it while I was at Bunnings.

That stuff is vastly overpriced for what it is. A Bunnings, Mitre 10, or other hardware store will have you covered for most things; the Internet will get the rest. You don’t need to spend a lot of time maintaining it after the initial treatment. It actually polishes up and becomes shinier and smoother with use. All the same pros as hemp, basically, with a few more thrown in. Jute makes for extremely good photos in it’s un-dyed state.

As synthetic ropes go, it’s a bit pricey. Nowhere near as pricey as the better natural fibre ropes, but it’s further up there than the previously mentioned ropes. Knots that look so-so with cotton or synthetic somehow look amazing with jute. It has a sort of liveliness to it. Has really excellent tooth; you can feel quite certain that your hitches etc will do the job to hold things in place. Far fewer knots required. It actually polishes up and becomes shinier and smoother with use. That’s right, it doesn’t degrade. Not recommended for suspension. If you want to buy your own natural fiber rope and condition it yourself so that it is ready to use for bondage without being too prone to giving you or your partner rope burn, McVarij has a nice tutorial on what you need to do.